Log in

Create a user profile using your existing professional profile on LinkedIn, Academia, or ResearchGate.


Alternatively, register a username and password to start an account.


By creating an account you will be able to contribute articles, engage in discussion groups, network with fellow professionals and businesses, and receive interest-related alerts.

Forgot Password

Please enter your email address below and you will receive a temporary link to re-activate your account

Article image

Ndwakhulu Tshishonga

30 June 2015

English

Township Studies Librarian One

Journal article

Township Studies Group

South Africa

Downloads

Website References

Culture

Economic empowerment

Economics

Finance

Gender

Livelihoods

South Africa

Township

The Socio-Economic and Cultural Implications of Skhotane

Youth’s (Under)Development at Ekurhuleni’s Towwnship(s) of South Africa

This article examines the socio-economic implications that the controversial sub-culture of skhothane has on the development or underdevelopment of youth at ekurhuleni and surrounding townships. It interrogates skhothane within the post-modern expressive youth culture. In the township(s) of ekurhuleni, skhothane is regarded not only as a controversial sub-culture but also as a lifestyle whereby young people compete in acquiring material goods with the ultimate purpose of destroying them. this practice co-exists alongside youth unemployment and underdevelopment which is exacerbated by poverty, rising unemployment and gross inequalities. the author argues that the practice of skhothane sub-culture does not only undermine the policies and programmes aimed at the socio-economic upliftment of young people but turns the youth into materialistic consumers. In this article, young people are viewed as victims of post-modern lifestyles who are socialised under an intergenerational culture of poverty and underdevelopment. It uses primary data from selected interviews with skhothane members and general members of local communities and secondary sources from books, accredited journals and newspapers. 

View Contributors:

Comments

No comments available
LOAD MORE