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Built Environment Support Group, City Insight, Danielle Duke-Norris, Partners in Development, Swelihle Agricultural & Environmental Group

01 January 2019

Built Environment Support Group

English

uKESA Librarian2

Guideline

South Africa

Downloads

Website References

Adaptation

Biodiversity

Built environment

Climate Change/Resilience

Communities

Environmental management

Food security

Governance

Greenhouse effect

Human settlements

Livelihoods

Mitigation

Natural environment

Policy

Poverty & inequality

Rural

South Africa

Sustainability

Urban

Vulnerability

Water and sanitation

uMgungundlovu Climate Change Adaptation Toolkit

uMngeni Resilience Project 2019

This Toolkit has been developed as part of the uMngeni Resilience Project to help decision makers be proactive rather than reactive in their responses to the impacts of climate change on communities in the uMgungundlovu District Municipality (uMDM).

Climate change adaptation is vital to the development goals of South Africa and the uMDM. Reducing the vulnerability of communities will ultimately lead to more sustained benefits of development work and efforts to reduce poverty.
 

The Toolkit provides recommendations on how decision makers, traditional authorities and rural communities can adopt new ways of building climate resilient villages and houses. This then allows an opportunity to re-think how rural areas can be planned.

Many of the adaptation strategies proposed in this guideline can give multiple benefits. For example, planting indigenous plants both increases biodiversity and reduces flood risks. It also creates a more liveable neighbourhood.

Abstract based on original source.

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